Russia women's national ice hockey team

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Russia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Большая красная машина (The Big Red Machine)
AssociationIce Hockey Federation of Russia
Head coachYevgeni Bobariko
AssistantsDenis Afinogenov
Sergei Kostyukhin
Alexander Verdernikov
CaptainOlga Sosina
Team colors              
IIHF codeRUS
Russia national hockey team jerseys - 2014 Winter Olympics.png
Ranking
Current IIHF4 Steady (24 April 2020)[1]
Highest IIHF4 (first in 2013)
Lowest IIHF6 (first in 2005)
First international
Switzerland   2–1  Russia
(Brampton, Canada; 1 April 1994)
Biggest win
Russia  15–0  France
(Esbjerg, Denmark; 28 March 1995)
Russia  16–1  Denmark
(Lyss, Switzerland; 29 December 1997)
Biggest defeat
United States  15–0  Russia
(Mississauga, Canada; 4 April 2000)
World Championships
Appearances16 (first in 1997)
Best result3rd place, bronze medalist(s) (2001, 2013, 2016)
European Championships
Appearances2 (first in 1995)
Best result2nd place, silver medalist(s) (1996)
Olympics
Appearances4 (first in 2002)
International record (W–L–T)
103–130–7
Russia women's national ice hockey team
Medal record
World Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2001 United States
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Canada
Bronze medal – third place 2016 Canada

The Russian women's national ice hockey team represents Russia at the International Ice Hockey Federation's IIHF World Women's Championships. The women's national team is controlled by Ice Hockey Federation of Russia. Russia had 2,376 female players in 2018.[2]

The Russian women warming up before the game against China at the 2010 Winter Olympics.

History[edit]

On 1 April 1994, Russia played its first game in Brampton, Canada, losing 1–2 to Switzerland.[3] Russia is currently ranked 4th in the world in women's ice hockey. This is also the highest rank in team's history. Three times – at 2001 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships, the 2013 IIHF Women's World Championship and the 2016 IIHF Women's World Championship Russia reached 3rd place by upsetting Finland in the bronze medal game.

Tournament record[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

World Championship[edit]

  • 1997 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1999 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2000 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2001Bronze medal icon.svg Won bronze medal
  • 2004 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2005 – Finished in 8th place
  • 2007 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2008 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2009 – Finished in 5th place[5]
  • 2011 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2012 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2013Bronze medal icon.svg Won bronze medal
  • 2015 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2016Bronze medal icon.svg Won bronze medal
  • 2017 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2019 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2020 – Cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic[6]

European Championship[edit]

  • 1995 – Finished in 7th place (won Pool B)
  • 1996Silver medal icon.svg Won silver medal

Team[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Roster for the 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship.[7][8]

Head Coach: Alexei Chistyakov

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
7 F Diana Kanayeva 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (1997-03-27) 27 March 1997 (age 23) Russia HC St. Petersburg
11 D Liana Ganeyeva 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (1997-12-20) 20 December 1997 (age 22) Russia SK Gorny
13 D Nina Pirogova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 68 kg (150 lb) (1999-01-26) 26 January 1999 (age 21) Russia Tornado Moscow
15 F Valeria PavlovaA 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1995-04-15) 15 April 1995 (age 25) Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk
17 F Fanuza Kadirova 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (1998-04-06) 6 April 1998 (age 22) Russia SK Gorny
18 F Olga SosinaA 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1992-07-27) 27 July 1992 (age 27) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
22 D Maria Batalova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1996-05-03) 3 May 1996 (age 24) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
23 F Anna Timofeyeva 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 77 kg (170 lb) (1996-11-30) 30 November 1996 (age 23) Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk
27 D Anastasia Chistyakova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1997-02-11) 11 February 1997 (age 23) Russia HC St. Petersburg
30 G Valeria Merkusheva 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 66 kg (146 lb) (1999-09-30) 30 September 1999 (age 20) Russia HC St. Petersburg
31 G Anna Prugova 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 65 kg (143 lb) (1986-01-03) 3 January 1986 (age 34) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
33 D Daria Teryoshkina 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1998-01-11) 11 January 1998 (age 22) United States Maine Black Bears
42 F Oxana Bratisheva 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 53 kg (117 lb) (2000-06-05) 5 June 2000 (age 20) Russia SKIF Nizhny Novgorod
59 F Yelena Dergachyova 1.59 m (5 ft 3 in) 55 kg (121 lb) (1995-11-08) 8 November 1995 (age 24) Russia Tornado Moscow
68 F Alevtina Shtaryova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 65 kg (143 lb) (1997-02-09) 9 February 1997 (age 23) Russia Tornado Moscow
70 D Anna ShibanovaC 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (1994-11-10) 10 November 1994 (age 25) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
72 D Anna Savonina 1.61 m (5 ft 3 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (2001-12-05) 5 December 2001 (age 18) Russia Tornado Moscow
73 F Viktoria Kulishova 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1999-08-12) 12 August 1999 (age 20) Russia SKIF Nizhny Novgorod
76 D Yekaterina Nikolayeva 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 66 kg (146 lb) (1995-10-05) 5 October 1995 (age 24) Russia HC St. Petersburg
88 F Yekaterina Smolina 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1988-10-08) 8 October 1988 (age 31) Russia HC St. Petersburg
90 F Alexandra Vafina 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 57 kg (126 lb) (1990-07-28) 28 July 1990 (age 29) Russia SKIF Nizhny Novgorod
92 G Nadezhda Morozova 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1996-11-29) 29 November 1996 (age 23) Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk
97 F Anna Shokhina 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 68 kg (150 lb) (1997-06-23) 23 June 1997 (age 23) Russia Tornado Moscow

Notable players[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IIHF Women's World Ranking". IIHF. 24 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  2. ^ Profile
  3. ^ "Women's international matches 1993/94" (in French). HockeyArchives. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
  4. ^ "IOC sanctions six Russian athletes and closes one case as part of the Oswald Commission findingsdate=December 12, 2017". olympic.org. Retrieved 13 December 2017.
  5. ^ "Final Ranking As of SUN 12 APR 2009" (PDF). IIHF.com. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
  6. ^ "Women's Worlds cancelled". iihf.com. 7 March 2020.
  7. ^ "Состав женской национальной сборной России для участия в чемпионате мира". fhr.ru. 31 March 2019.
  8. ^ 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship roster

External links[edit]